17 Mythical Processors from the History of Overclocking

Tom’s Hardware France have published a really interesting article / slide show for anyone with a taste for old PC hardware, especially older CPUs. The article is in French as you might expect (Google Translate to the rescue…) and is entitled ‘Les 17 processeurs mythiques de l'histoire de l'overclocking’. Written by Don Woligroski it basically offers a trip down memory lane from a strictly overclocking perspective. Well worth a look if you are of the retro inclination.

The slide show goes back as far as 1992, looking at the Intel i486 DX2, a single core 32-bit chip that arrived in three versions; 40 MHz, 50 MHz and 66 MHz. In classic overclocking fashion it was possible for enthusiasts to buy a cheaper i486DX2-40 (40MHz) then change the bus speed from 20MHz to 33MHz via a jumper on the motherboard to basically get the same performance as the more expensive i486DX2-66. A nice free upgrade with a boost of 65%, a massive boost when you’re paying $600 a pop.

Other classic chips include the AMD Athlon Duron series from around the turn of the millennium. Back then it was possible to unlock the multiplier of a cheaper Duron CPU by using a pencil or even better, conductive ink to alter the golden bridges present on the CPU. This allowed you to crank up the performance of the $80 budget CPU to something much closer to a $300 Athlon part. The old good days really were pretty good, no?

You can catch the full slide show featuring 17 classic overclocking CPUs here on Tom’s Hardware France.


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Taiwan sdougal says:

Gotta love a bit of retro...

United States Mr.Scott says:

Always. :)

says:

I wonder how many members of the BOT were old enough back then to experience these things.
I was.
Celeron 300A was the frenzy.
Some years later Hipro5 ( George ), hit for the first time in the world 5ghz
with a Prescott 478 on a P4C800E-deluxe revision 2, chilled by a heavily modded Prometeia Mach II.
Paired with a set of Kingston HyperX 533 modules and an Nvidia 8800Gt,
he wrote history.

Nice times.

United States Mr.Scott says:

george.kokovinis said: I wonder how many members of the BOT were old enough back then to experience these things.
I was.

Me too.
Still experience it to this day. :celebration:

South Africa Oj0 says:

george.kokovinis said: I wonder how many members of the BOT were old enough back then to experience these things.
I was.
Celeron 300A was the frenzy.
Some years later Hipro5 ( George ), hit for the first time in the world 5ghz
with a Prescott 478 on a P4C800E-deluxe revision 2, chilled by a heavily modded Prometeia Mach II.
Paired with a set of Kingston HyperX 533 modules and an Nvidia 8800Gt,
he wrote history.

Nice times.


I think your memory is a bit (very) warped there :p

says:

Oj0 said: I think your memory is a bit (very) warped there :p
Really ? Why don't you enlighten us all, with your so kind manners sir ? Indeed, I am 58 years old, and I might experience memory issues...

South Africa Oj0 says:

george.kokovinis said: Really ?

Why don't you enlighten us all, with your so kind manners sir ?

Indeed, I am 58 years old, and I might experience memory issues...


The biggest issue is the GeForce 8800GT wasn't out when 5 GHz was broken for the first time, and was still about half a decade away :D

But other than that I believe it was Tom's Hardware (forget the exact guy's name) with an LN2 cooled CPU and phase change cooled Northbridge.

Let me see if I can find the details quickly.

K404 says:

I was going to question the inclusion of the 8800GT as well, but from a different angle :D By the time the 8800GT came out, Cedar Mill was offering 5GHz on air. ...and the P4C800E was AGP :p I remember Tom Holck hitting 7GHz with "some Intel chip" I only "knew" about AMD back then.

says:

Folks you are right about AGP and 8800GT.
HUGE mistake from my side.

But I think ( as far as I know ), that on the 478 platform, Hipro5
was the first to hit 5.0ghz on a Prometeia MachII, with a Prescott 3.4
and a P4C800E-deluxe.

Apologies for the VGA misleading info.

K404 says:

It's ok, it me being really fussy. The GPU is the least important part of a CPU validation :D I have good memories of the Opto 144. My first ever 3GHz was with one :D

South Africa Oj0 says:

No problem george.kokovinis :) It's always hard to say for sure as not everything was documented back then, but also a lot that was documented was done so on sites that predated HWBOT and no longer exist. That being said, this is to the best of my knowledge the first ever 5 GHz run 5 GHz Project: CPU Cooling With Liquid Nitrogen

says:

Oj0 said: No problem george.kokovinis :) It's always hard to say for sure as not everything was documented back then, but also a lot that was documented was done so on sites that predated HWBOT and no longer exist. That being said, this is to the best of my knowledge the first ever 5 GHz run 5 GHz Project: CPU Cooling With Liquid Nitrogen
Read the whole article and enjoyed it very much. Indeed, info from that era is scarce and hard to find. What I do know 110% is that P4C800E was a hell of a motherboard. Was lucky to have two. One was running with blue Kngston HyperX 533 - 3/3/4 The other with OCZ Gold 500 - 3/3/5 My Prescott 3.4 did fully stable and benchable for hours 4.00ghz on Vapochill ( modded ). Had 4.3ghz as CPU validation, but not stable at all. The OCZ gold were ( if I recall correctly ) the only sticks that could do 1T. Know what folks ? I still have them both. Kingston and OCZ. 2 sticks of each ( 512mb per stick ). Had paid an arm and a leg back then for those. Ahh, nice memories:)

Belarus max1024 says:

Good article, hope HWBOT Old School is near :)

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