HWBoints

HWBoints

The Leagues and Points at HWBOT

The collective term for all things related to the Leagues and Points at HWBOT is HWBoints

The HWBoint engine hands out points to overclocking results based on how noteworthy they are. A high rank in a very popular benchmark application like XTU will get you more HWBoints than a high rank in for example PCMark05, as there is less competition. The same applies to a specific hardware you used. You might not be ranked high in the main ranking, but if you have the fastest processor / videocard of your kind, you’ll recieve a decent amount of points too. Again, the more people are using this piece of hardware, the more points you receive. E.g. you will recieve a lot more points for having the fastest GeForce GTX 980 Ti, than having the fastest Radeon R5 230.

Since the HWBoints featured for the first time in 2006, the algorithm has undergone several updates. In this article we outline the latest revision of the HWBoints.

Index

  • 1. Overclockers League
  • 2. Hardware Masters
  • 3. Teams League
  • 4. Country League
  • 5. Global, Hardware, and WR Points
  • 6. OC-ESPORTS Points
  • 7. Team Power Points (coming soon)
  • 8. Algorithms and Formulas (coming soon)

 

1. Overclockers League

The Overclockers League is the most prominent leaderboard at HWBOT. Developed by former staff member Mtzki and introduced in 2006, the League has undergone many updates to accomodate all aspects of overclocking. In its current form, the League is based on three parameters: benchmark rankings, hardware rankings, and competitions. Your Overclockers League score is calculated as follows:

OCL = SUM [Top15(benchmark) + Top20(hardware) + Top10(competition)]

For more information on how the different types of points are calculated, see section 5) Global, Hardware, and WR Points.

The League is sub-divided in five categories, depending on your status in the overclocking world. There are: Elite, Extreme, Enthusiast, Novice, and Rookie overclockers. Each class has its own leaderboard, but the points are all based on the same algorithms and points. The classes are defined as follows:

  • Elite: The top crop of the overclocking world – compete with LN2, engineering samples and connected to the hardware industry.
  • Extreme: Compete with all types of extreme cooling and use retail hardware. Not backed by the hardware industry.
  • Enthusiast: Use only ambient cooling
  • Novice: Use ambient cooling and has been at the site less than one year
  • Rookie: Use ambient cooling and has been at the site less than three months

For more information on the Overclockers League, check out the following links:

 

2. Hardware Masters

The Hardware Masters is different from any other ranking at HWBOT. It features the leaderboard based on how you perform in hardware categories only, ranking overclockers by the total sum of hardware points. The calculation of the Hardware Masters is thus as follows:

HWM = SUM [All(hardware)]

For more information on the Hardware Masters, check out the following links.

 

3. Teams League

The Teams League is the only leaderboard that ranks communities by their overclocking strength. Each overclocker member of the team contributes to the team’s points in two ways. First, there are the Team PowerPoints which are awarded to the best score of the team in any benchmark or hardware ranking. Second, a tenth of the total member points also contributes to the team. Thus, the formula to calculate the Team League is as follows:

TL = SUM [ALL(TeamPowerPoints) + 1/10 (member points)]

For more information on how the different types of points are calculated, see section X) Points. For more information on the Teams League, check out the following links.

 

4. Country League

The least well known leaderboard at HWBOT is the Country League. The Country League is based on the effort and achievements of all members of a specific country added up to one total. The formula to calculate the Country League is as follows:

CL = SUM [ALL(member points)]

For more information on the Country League, check out the following links.

 

5. Global, Hardware, and WR Points

The HWBoints algorithm awards points to overclocking results based on they rank within a certain ranking. The higher you place within a ranking, the more points you collect. Also, the more overclockers compete in the ranking the more points a certain position will give you. For the member rankings (not team!), there are two main types of points: global and hardware.

A) Global Points

Global points are awarded based on your position in an overall benchmark ranking. The benchmark ranking is defined by the benchmark application and, in case the benchmark is multi-threaded, by the active CPU or GPU core count. For example, SuperPI 1M (click) has a single global benchmark ranking because the benchmark is single threaded. Cinebench R15 (click) has multiple global benchmark rankings because the benchmark is multi-threaded. The same applies to 3DMark Fire Strike (click) as the benchmark scales with multiple graphics cards.

At the moment, 25 benchmark applications have Global Points enabled. In total, there are 231 benchmark rankings with Global Points. (August 30, 2015)

Global Points are awarded based on two parameters: position in the benchmark ranking and the weight of the benchmark ranking. The position is determined by how well you rank amongst your fellow overclockers. The weight of the ranking is determined by the amount of active overclockers in the benchmark ranking in the past year. For more information on the algorithm, please refer to Section 8) Global Points Formula.

The maximum Global Points for first place in any benchmark ranking is 166.4 points. The minimum Global Points for first place in any benchmark ranking is 10 points. Currently 5912 overclockers earn 330,242 Global Points. (August 30, 2015)

The Global Points rankings can be found on the benchmark overview page. From the front page you can access any benchmark overview page by clicking on Benchmarks in the menu. On this page you find a list of all benchmarks. Click on the benchmark name to access the benchmark overview page. For example, this is the Cinebench R15 overview page. Under the section Benchmark overview you can find the different Global rankings, split up by core count if the benchmark is multi-threaded.

On any overclocking result page (or “submission”), you can find the awarded Global Points under the section Points Earned. In the field next to “Global Points (UGP)”, you find the total amount of Global Points the overclocking result is worth.

B) Hardware Points

Hardware points are awarded based on your position in a hardware ranking. The hardware ranking is defined by the hardware item, the benchmark application, and in case the benchmark is multi-threaded, by the active CPU or GPU core count. For example, the SuperPI 1M Core i7 4770K (click) has a single hardware ranking for this specific combination of hardware and benchmark because the benchmark is single threaded. The 3DMark Fire Strike Extreme GeForce GTX 980 Ti (click) features four hardware rankings for this combination of hardware and benchmark because the benchmark is multi-threaded.

At the moment, 43 benchmark applications have Hardware Points enabled. In total, there are 44,446 hardware rankings with Hardware Points. (August 30, 2015)

Hardware Points are awarded based on two parameters: position in the hardware ranking and the weight of the hardware ranking. The position is determined by how well you rank amongst your fellow overclockers using the same benchmark and hardware. The weight of the ranking is determined by the amount of participants in the hardware ranking (all time). For more information on the algorithm, please refer to Section 8) Hardware Points Formula.

The maximum Hardware Points for first place in any hardware ranking is 50 points. The minimum Hardware Points for first place in any hardware ranking is 2 points. Currently 49568 overclockers earn 1,705,121 Hardware Points. (August 30, 2015)

The Hardware Points rankings can be found on the hardware overview page. From the front page you can access any hardware overview page by using the search bar in the top right corner. Type a part of the hardware name and click on the dropdown item. For example, this is the Core i7 4770K overview page. On this page you find a list of all hardware rankings, split up by benchmark (list) and core count (tab) in case the benchmark is multi-threaded.

On any overclocking result page (or “submission”), you can find the awarded Hardware Points under the section Points Earned. In the field next to “Hardware Points (UHP)”, you find the total amount of Hardware Points the overclocking result is worth.

C) WR Points

WR, or World Record, points are a special kind. To address issues we will discuss in Section X), WR points are awarded to the top 10 overclocking results in the Hall of Fame of benchmark applications with WR points enabled. The main purpose of the WR points is to award points to severly undervalued World Records in benchmarks with Global Points enabled.

At the moment, 15 Benchmark applications have World Record Points enabled. (August 30, 2015)

World Record points are awarded based on a single parameter: position in the benchmark hall of fame. The point awarded to each position in the top 10 are fixed. For more information on the algorithm, please refer to Section 8) World Record Points Formula.

The maximum World Record Points for first place in a benchmark hall of fame is 100 points. The minimum World Record Points for tenth place in a benchmark hall of fame is 5 points. Currently 64 overclockers earn 5905 Hardware Points. (August 30, 2015)

The World Record Points rankings can be found on the benchmark hall of fame page. From the front page you can access any benchmark overview page by clicking on Benchmarks in the menu. On this page you find a list of all benchmarks. Click on the benchmark name to access the benchmark overview page. For example, this is the Cinebench R15 overview page. On the right-hand side, next to the benchmark name, you find the hyperlink Hall of Fame linking you to the benchmark hall of fame.

On any overclocking result page (or “submission”), you can find the awarded World Record Points under the section Points Earned. In the field next to “World Record Points (UWP)”, you find the total amount of World Record Points the overclocking result is worth.

 

6. OC-ESPORTS Points

In the Overclockers League, OC-ESPORTS points are awarded to the top 10 competition results in the past 365 days. The point distribution follows the format set out by the OC-ESPORTS Official World Overclocking Ranking. You can find the detailed information here: http://oc-esports.io/#!/rankings-details.

 

7. Team Power Points

Coming soon

 

8. Algorithm and Formulas

Coming soon


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