Intel doesn't wait for fixed 6 Series chips, resumes some shipments

Looks like someone in the Intel office suddenly discovered not selling chipsets also means no money incoming. Oops!

After talking to its partners and most likely crunching serious numbers, Intel has decided that it's fine to resume shipments of 6 Series chipsets that have the design flaw that can lead to degraded performance over the supported SATA 3.0 Gbps ports.

According to Intel, it will only deliver bugged chips to PC makers who will build systems that would not be affected by the issue. This likely means we'll be seeing Sandy Bridge laptops back on sale soon as they can use the two SATA 6.0 Gbps ports unaffected by the bug. Of course, some desktops may qualify for shipping too, if they only have an optical drive and a hard/solid state drive, but their maker will have to tell customers the free SATA 3.0 connectors available are troublesome.

The problematic 6 Series chips have their days numbered though as Intel has already begun manufacturing of bug-free B3 stepping silicon and that will start shipping at the end of this month.


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Belgium Massman says:

The key issue here is that Intel announced a total recall.

End-users are smart enough to make their own decisions. If you don't like a defective product, even if you will never experience the defect, you can just RMA the board and get a brand-new in return. If you don't care about the defect because you only use two SATA products, you can just continue to use it. If you are a heavy user of the HDD subsystem, having for instance 4 HDDs, and are actively using the defective SATA ports, you can exchange the board.

In the end, Intel made their product look worse than it really is. They also made their end-users paranoid and unsure about what to do with a defective board. Last but not least, they organised a total recall costing them shitloads of money. Perhaps there was too much panic in the office and decisions were taken too fast?

United States steponz says:

If its not losing data on port.. I don't see what the big issue is....

Just use the other controller.... geesh...

United States Linuxfan says:

Massman said:
In the end, Intel made their product look worse than it really is. They also made their end-users paranoid and unsure about what to do with a defective board. Last but not least, they organised a total recall costing them shitloads of money. Perhaps there was too much panic in the office and decisions were taken too fast?

Word. :)

K404 says:

steponz said: If its not losing data on port.. I don't see what the big issue is....

Just use the other controller.... geesh...



I've seen a lot of these comments and yea, it's a valid workaround, but I wouldn't ever buy a monitor that had the DVI connector bricked, knowing I could just use the VGA instead.... for example.

Doesn't feel right. You're buying an known-to-be faulty product thats (now) ONLY on the shelves because the company is concerned about making money.

I think this is a lose-lose situation for Intel. They abandoned money to fix a problem that should never had seen the light of the day... trying to do the right thing, now they're cutting corners on the fix to make money in the meantime.

If recalled boards started making their way back to mobo distributers for part replacement, now they need shipped out again for nothing, unless mobo companies are gonna remove some s-ata connectors and add some new feature stickers so there's 100% functionality on a slightly cut-down board.

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