HWBOT Vision 2012

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HWBOT Vision 2012

Author: Pieter-Jan Plaisier

I know, we are a bit late with this editorial. The year 2012 is already 21 days old and just today we are publishing the editorial that describes what we will try to do with HWBOT in 2012. However, no time to moan about the late article, here we go!

At the end of March this year, it will be exactly two and a half years that HWBOT has been running (semi-)professionally. Back in October 2009, HWBOT had no funding to even cover the basic expenses like web hosting and server costs, let alone enough to pay a salary for a full-time employee. We gave ourselves six months to prove it would be possible to at least have this site run break-even. Although we didn’t achieve that goal, thanks to the overclocking community as well as our partners, we had positive outlooks and continued the path taken.

Today, HWBOT is financially reasonably stable. Not only can we, once in a while, schedule development cycles with major new functionality (requires a full-time developer), but we also have the option to look forward and make plans for the future. Although development time is still our biggest bottleneck, these are the topics we will work on during 2012: hire full-time developer, foundation for overclocking, preparing 2013 overclocking season, improve competition fairness and styles and in general: make more sense of overclocking.

1. Hire full-time HWBOT developer.

The first and most important task for HWBOT every year is to find enough funding to hire a full-time developer. Although we’ve been trying to accomplish this goal since October 2009, we’ve never really been close to achieving it. There are several reasons for that, most of which are related to the local situation with regards to taxes, living costs and competitive market. Or, to put it in more simple terms: the money we need to hire a good full-time developer is, in Belgium, quite high. Moving to another country would actually solve a large part of the financial issues in this regard, but as you know Frederik, HWBOT founder and number one developer, has added a new member to his family, which makes moving abroad not an option. Five years ago, who knows, maybe it would’ve been.
The situation is what it is, however, and it’s pointless to keep complaining about it. Instead, we prefer to search for solutions. For the first time in HWBOT history, we are reservedly positive about accomplishing this goal. Without going too much into detail (as not everything is final yet), we hope to announce hiring Frederik as second full-time employee this.

2. Foundation for overclocking.

Although I often get asked to, it’s not very easy to describe HWBOT in one sentence or sales pitch. Yes, we host a database with overclocking results, but we’re not just that. Yes, we have different overclocking leagues, but we’re not just that. Yes, we host overclocking competitions for partners, but HWBOT is not just that.

Above everything mentioned in the above paragraph, HWBOT must provide the overclocking community with a reference platform for the overclocking hobby. A foundation, if you will, that allows other projects to grow on. HWBOT does not have to host the largest overclocking forum, but has to support other communities and forums to grow and foster the passion for overclocking. We don’t have to host the world’s biggest overclocking competitions (or promote them as such); our main task is to make sure that this kind of competitions exists and gives individuals and communities a chance to do what they love most: overclocking.

In 2012 (and 2013), we will continue to build this foundation. To be more specific, we are working on a more structured version of competitive overclocking. In 2013, an overclocking year at HWBOT will be split up in four different parts: two three-month online competition seasons, one international live season, an HWBOT Country Cup and three one-month break periods.

3. Prepare the 2013 HWBOT Overclocking Season.

In 2013, the competitive aspect of overclocking at HWBOT will be divided into four parts: the four leagues as we know them today, the recently introduced challenges, the standalone partner competitions and the new HWBOT competition season. Apart from the competition season, everything remains as you know it today: we have no new HWBOINT algorithm updates planned (or under discussion), the challenges remain as they are today (give or take a few enhancements) and of course partners will regularly come up with competitions where you can win cool prizes.

The competitive overclocking year at HWBOT is, as mentioned before, divided into several parts. In January we announce the first overclocking season, which will run from February till end of April. In the beginning of May, we announce the second season which runs from June until the end of August. January and May are break periods, with no HWBOT organized competitions, during which you can prepare for the two large competitions. From September until the end of October, we have the so-called international overclocking season during which, usually, the live finals of the GIGABYTE GOOC and MSI MOA are being held. Around mid-October, we will announce the structure for the Country Cup which will run from November until mid-December (avoiding the holiday season).

The two three-month during competitions, currently known under the working title “Team OC Cup” (source), will replace the current monthly oc challenges and have a similar structure as the Country Cups we’ve been hosting for the past three years. Note that, although it’s going to replace the monthly competitions, it will not change the spirit of the monthly challenges. These two large team competitions will revolve mostly around older hardware and affordable systems. HWBOT partners will have the opportunity to support these competitions (e.g.: with prizes), but will have no definitive say in any of the stage limitations or hardware requirements. Just to say: it’s not going to be for the latest greatest super high-end hardware.

In the second half of 2012, we start with a first round of this concept. This includes the three-month team competition, a country cup and (hopefully) another live OC final of either GIGABYTE or MSI.

4. Improve competition fairness and introduce new competition styles.

In the same area as the new competition seasons, we will try to improve competition fairness and introduce new structures. By improving fairness, we don’t just mean catching the bad guys and updating our HWBOT Rulebook, but also continue to put effort into different benchmark wrapper software as well as trying to address the financial inequality of the different regions in each competition. We’ll also continue to search for alternative ways to detect on which configurations benchmark results have been achieved, hoping to find more reliable verification for frequency or cooling methods.

As for competition styles, we refer to the never-ending battle against sandbagging which, thanks to very good suggestions from community members, might turn out to be the best inspiration for even more creative competitions. We’re also referring to an already planned new competition style known as ‘knock-out’, which will change the overclocking competitions from a one-against-all format into a one-against-one event. We’re also referring to a still-to-be documented idea which, ehrm, will remain a secret for now.

5. Support for public demos, overclocking events and gatherings.

With great pleasure, we see that the amount of overclocking gatherings is growing around the world. Not only do more and more hardware vendors ask overclockers to demo their products in public, but now also more and more overclocking communities are taking matters in their own hands and are organizing small overclocking-related events.

The social aspect of overclocking, where people with a shared passion meet in real life, is something HWBOT is determined to play an active role in. Perhaps not just in the organization of events, but definitely in the exposure and, as we mentioned before, the foundation of it. We are, for instance, looking into developing functionality that would allow any HWBOT user to not only announce an overclocking gathering, but also allow participants to upload their results, post videos and pictures or comment on it. The underlying principle is similar to the rest of HWBOT: our mission is to give the communities a foundation which they can build their own projects on.

Functionality that has already been added, but nevertheless part of the vision, is the live competition support of HCE (source). This small feature allows us to relay information of a live competition (e.g.: MOA) more accurately by presenting live rankings, results and participant info on a single HWBOT competition page.

6. In general …

In general, the goals we set for 2012 revolve around one major topic: “Making more sense of this overclocking hobby”. Whether it’s by re-structuring the HWBOT competitions, updating our rulebook or adding event management functionality, the main goal of HWBOT is to give the overclocking community a solid foundation that not only makes the entire overclocking experience more enjoyable, but also helps to explain to outsiders where the passion comes from. Having a clearly structured overclocking year (with seasons, cups and live competitions) may help to explain to your loved ones why you need time to overclock next weekend. Having an event management function can help you explain to a possible event partner how sponsoring an event results in exposure. Improving fairness by addressing financial inequality can help the less fortunate to show what they are capable of regardless of how new their system is.

Being the relatively small group of enthusiasts that we are, the overclocking community and its members often has to over-justify their hobby. Justifying spending time on a hobby is difficult for everyone, regardless of the hobby. So, maybe with our efforts we can make it a bit easier for you to explain all this overclocking stuff to yourself, to your friends and to everyone else.

Have a good 2012!

HWBOT Staff.


18

Australia Dinos22 says:

Good to hear guys. I'm personally glad GIGABYTE has stepped up from get-go and kept its support all this time and now we have all these other great sponsors supporting the community as well :). The community would be lost without HWBOT, it's the glue that bonds us all and simply irreplaceable! Keep pushing it, as the famous Dane would say! :celebration: I'm looking forward to some cool OC stuff we are planning for this year with you guys, should be fun! p.s. sorry that was a bit too positive, i'll have to neutralise it a bit >> massmansux :D

Belgium Teemto says:

Why not make a new call for some voluntary donations?
Maybe give a new achievement in return? "Make a HWbot donation two years in a row" ?

India sumonpathak says:

maybe it will sound a bit rude..but all the companies should look and scout for new overclockers...its sad that they keep on supporting only the known faces:( whats your take HWBOT?

United States Hondacity says:

sumonpathak said: maybe it will sound a bit rude..but all the companies should look and scout for new overclockers...its sad that they keep on supporting only the known faces:( whats your take HWBOT?
are you serious? the topic is hwbot vision 2012. say something positive.

Belgium Teemto says:

Maybe make a renewed appeal for donations? Maybe create a new achievement as compensation;
"Contributed to Hwbot 2 years in a row" ?

Or else (intended as joke ;-) ):

"Donated 5€/$ to Hwbot" -> "I'm cheap" status
"Donated 50€ to Hwbot" -> "I'm following a dieet to save money" status
"Donated 500€ to Hwbot" -> "Wish I'd spent it on a new Graphics card" status
"Donated 5,000€ to Hwot" -> "I employed children to sell a lot of cookies from door to door" status
"Donated 50,000€ to Hwbot" -> "I sold my kidney" status
"Donated 500,000€ to Hwbot" -> "Arms dealer looking to diversify" status
"Donated 5,000,000€ or more to Hwot' -> "My real name is Bill Gates" status

Belgium Teemto says:

Seems this one ended up in the wrong section.

Belgium Massman says:

sumonpathak said: maybe it will sound a bit rude..but all the companies should look and scout for new overclockers...its sad that they keep on supporting only the known faces:(
whats your take HWBOT?


You have a month time to discuss all the aspects of that problem? :D

Long story short: yes, the more people are involved the better, but I can understand why companies place "safe bets" and prefer to sample to people they've worked with for a long time.

'Scouting' is weird terminology, imho. It implies that companies would somehow benefit from sampling products to a relatively unknown name in the community. I don't think overclocking is a sport where you can 'cash-in' on finding a new 'individual'. Perhaps if you first sample and then hire for R&D; but apart from that ... not sure.

Teemto said: Maybe make a renewed appeal for donations? Maybe create a new achievement as compensation;
"Contributed to Hwbot 2 years in a row" ?

Or else (intended as joke ;-) ):

"Donated 5€/$ to Hwbot" -> "I'm cheap" status
"Donated 50€ to Hwbot" -> "I'm following a dieet to save money" status
"Donated 500€ to Hwbot" -> "Wish I'd spent it on a new Graphics card" status
"Donated 5,000€ to Hwot" -> "I employed children to sell a lot of cookies from door to door" status
"Donated 50,000€ to Hwbot" -> "I sold my kidney" status
"Donated 500,000€ to Hwbot" -> "Arms dealer looking to diversify" status
"Donated 5,000,000€ or more to Hwot' -> "My real name is Bill Gates" status


Heh, I like the idea. I'd change the "I'm cheap" achievement with "I donated to this site and all I got was this lousy achievement" or so.

Belgium Teemto says:

LOL
that's indeed better

India sumonpathak says:

Massman said: You have a month time to discuss all the aspects of that problem? :D

u up for some discussion?:D
Massman said:
Perhaps if you first sample and then hire for R&D; but apart from that ... not sure.


how many companies are willing to do that? its always the same faces for them...IMHO it sometimes creates dissent among the oc community of that country and the community in general...

India sumonpathak says:

Hondacity said: are you serious? the topic is hwbot vision 2012. say something positive.


lets keep everything in view...shall we?
as for the positive side whatever the staff doing is admirable...but we shouldn't forget about the problems too..
after all its "VISION 2012" not "Summery POSITIVE ASPECTS only"..isn't??

Belgium Massman says:

sumonpathak said: u up for some discussion?:D

how many companies are willing to do that? its always the same faces for them...IMHO it sometimes creates dissent among the oc community of that country and the community in general...


Not many manufacturers are willing to do that, because only in exceptional cases an overclocker is a worthwile asset to the R&D team.

The fact that it's always the same faces doesn't seem so strange to me:

- long-standing relation = trust
- both company and overclocker knows what to expect
- safe(r) investment (samples cost money too)

Overclocking isn't a medium as widespread as we'd like it to be. Many marketers still don't have a clue how to use overclocking and turn it into a good tool for exposure. Also, most of the marketers are very unfamiliar with this scene and don't really know that much people, even locally. So, the safe-bet choice is usually the most prefered because then they know exactly what to expect in return for the sample that they send out.

Social unstability is a sad side-effect of this, I know, but companies aren't in it to create social stability (as we've all seen before). The first objective is making sure that the investment made will return in more profit. There are always multiple ways to spend budget so it will yield profit, but the ways are not always clear or transparent. Especially people who are unfamiliar with the overclocking scene, the untransparency of a different route can scare them off and they might decide it's too risky to do it. Even if you know there's almost no risk involved. The trick here is to convince those people there's no risk :).

On a more general note: I think one of the problems is also that, as a community, we're not very good in promoting this hobby. There's very little real consensus on what is considered 'the most important' in the world of overclocking: the hwbot rankings? the orb? the online competitions? moa/gooc? the number of golden cups? the ratio of points/results? Efficiency of results? Records on new hardware or old hardware? etc etc. Ask 10 different people and you get 10 different answers :).

The lack of a general consensus on what's 'the most important' (or at least some distinction) makes it very difficult to explain to outsiders who's hot and who's not. For example, I could tell people that Poland has the strongest overclockers because they won the latest Country Cup and the Cup is important because it's based on multiple types of hardware. Then someone else would say it's totally unimportant because the efficiency of most results was not perfect and you only needed to 'have' the hardware in order to win. You could say Romania is the best team because they won MOA, but then some would say the competition isn't that important because the qualification phase is not fully open and transparent. You could say Turrican is the best because he's 1st in the HW Masters, but then others could say he's first just because he benches a lot. In the end, the outsider who wants to understand this world will just give up because it doesn't make any sense.

Making more sense is what 2012 (and 2013) revolves around at HWBOT, fyi :p.

France Xyala says:

I agree, i'm having a close eye on the OC community for that last 4 years as member of OCTV, and since a few month I'm experimenting with a more "outsider" view so to say. It's quite flagrant if you compare simply social networks and forums activities of both communities.
Still after 3 years of full speed and smooth worldwide overclocking adoption by the opinion geeks/press/vendors , overclockers still are not evangelizing the masses enough or as powerful as gamers do.

First; no worry. It's never too late! Thanks for this vision :)

---

Sure the amount of gamer is higher and so does their influence. But I'm pretty sure that we should be able to do it much better and reach larger audiences.
As you say Peter, and this is completely a matter of eduction; at least for the overclockers to the masses relationship.

I'm looking forward to the fulfillment of the "making more sense" plan that you are envisioning with the BOT. Be sure to have all my support on that!

United States sin0822 says:

well this community is a lot bigger than it was 10 years ago when i picked up and learned how to OC, it really is. but if there is any place on the net where you can get a good feel for computer engineering it is through overclocking forums. IMO overclockers know the computer hardware better than anyone else on a regular platform to platform basis, there is no surprise that most reviewers at big sites were overclockers to begin with and there is also the visa versa. Then you have the problem where you have two different type of overclockers, the majority would actually frown upon the extreme stuff as you see for instance in some of the news threads at some forums when an extreme product is released. They frown because of the impracticality of the whole thing, they see a WR and they ask for stability tests lol or they see a detachable VRM and they think its the dumbest thing ever. Then we see a paint kit being provided with a GPU and we think its dumb, and they think its cool lol, go powercoloring. many don't understand the rush of benching with LN2 or the satisfaction from a WR, or they just feel that kind of stuff towards their 24/7 100 hour prime tested rig. IMo they are just as practical as the other, they are both part of the sport, maybe there should be a girls league and a boys league lol same sport played in different ways, like lacrosse. In girl lacross you can't hit the other people with the stick, but you can knock into them and the head of your stick is different for instance in comparing Girls lacrosse to practical OC and boys lacrosse to extreme OC. But anyways, I think the community will get bigger and bigger, that step by intel to give OC a warranty is IMO a great thing, probably the greatest since they introduced the K Sku for OCing as a whole, but NOT for OCers lol. IDK if that makes sense or not.

India thebanik says:

sumonpathak said: maybe it will sound a bit rude..but all the companies should look and scout for new overclockers...its sad that they keep on supporting only the known faces:(
whats your take HWBOT?


On what basis do you think they should look and scout overclockers??? You need to keep achieving scores to get attention. You need to keep buying your own hardware. Remember overclocking is not the way to get free hardware, very few have been able to achieve that but that is because they proved themselves first. They have been able to meet companies expectations (which is huge btw). Then too you would not get the hardware you expect. You may get motherboard but you may not get the CPU, so you would have to buy the CPU to meet the motherboard companies expectation, I guess you can make the rest how it works. Also at best you get hardware to review and not to overclock because companies are looking for ROI, a thread with Overclocking results would not give them the expected ROI until its a world record. There are opportunities few and far in between where a company will hire an overclocker, but everyone here knows that these people have been among the best (keep in mind I did not say THE BEST) for a long time. So stop thinking hwbot can provide you an answer, at best they can give us a fair platform and contests where we can win some cool prizes. Ofcourse I would like to be proven wrong and hope that 2012 will bring something completely new, :D

India sumonpathak says:

thebanik said: On what basis do you think they should look and scout overclockers??? You need to keep achieving scores to get attention. You need to keep buying your own hardware. Remember overclocking is not the way to get free hardware, very few have been able to achieve that but that is because they proved themselves first. They have been able to meet companies expectations (which is huge btw). Then too you would not get the hardware you expect. You may get motherboard but you may not get the CPU, so you would have to buy the CPU to meet the motherboard companies expectation, I guess you can make the rest how it works. Also at best you get hardware to review and not to overclock because companies are looking for ROI, a thread with Overclocking results would not give them the expected ROI until its a world record. There are opportunities few and far in between where a company will hire an overclocker, but everyone here knows that these people have been among the best (keep in mind I did not say THE BEST) for a long time. So stop thinking hwbot can provide you an answer, at best they can give us a fair platform and contests where we can win some cool prizes. Ofcourse I would like to be proven wrong and hope that 2012 will bring something completely new, :D


well..since u did reply...I BUY my own hardware...and if i am stuck with a crappy stuff..i try to make the best of it...
now...coming to the problems...or my whining..what i have seen for the past two yrs...that is..the companies..they refuse/cant see beyond a select few..be it for R & D or be it for OC results...maybe am just frustrated because the scene in the subcontinent is stagnant...but all i can see is all HW be it for R&D or whatever..goes to a select few...no matter how much the lesser known guys toil...
am not too blind to see or know how the scene works....but its a bit dodgy IMHO...and i sincerely hope HWBOT helps to solve it...and free the oc scene from the clutch of a few narrow eyed peeps.
[no offense intended to anyone...i got huge respect for all the clockers here..but i feel unappreciated for all the clocking and research i do]

peace

sumon

PS:dont really expect HWBOT to give me an answer...but i can make myself heard here...coz people are watching this place :p i hope..
please disregard if ya all think am talking BS.

United States sin0822 says:

I think the whole system of being in different leagues is a bit challenging, an outsider wouldn't know that those guys already have sponsors.

if you hit 1st place on a global WR on a fairly new platform, and its way up there manufactures will notice. Get max CPu clock frequency for Sbe for instance, you will get some attention.

United States hokiealumnus says:

Well, many of them don't have sponsors, like me. I write for a review site so my submissions sometimes come with the ES label; thus I have to be in the pro league to get points for my team. I'm not sponsored by any one company (or multiple companies) though. Rbuass doesn't have any sponsors that I know of, other than the fact that he works for Corsair now IIRC. He didn't even have that a little while ago. He just enjoys the challenge :)

United States dumo says:

For some peep, overclocking will always be an individual hobby. Buy your own hardware and tortured it the way you want it.

Play by the rules, independent, no commitment and answer to nobody:)

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