Der8auer's Guide for Haswell-E 4GHz+ Uncore (For All Motherboards)

  • News, Editorials, OC records, Gigabyte, Articles
  • 57
  • HWBOT

Der8auer’s Guide for Haswell-E 4GHz+ Uncore (For All Motherboards)

Roman Hartung

First of all I want to thank GIGABYTE. I had the possibility to bench at their OC Lab in Taipei, Taiwan for one week. Without their resources (CPUs and motherboars) I would not have figured this out. Thanks a lot guys especially Sofos and HiCookie!

NOTE: This is all based on some reverse engineering and experimenting. I’m just reporting what worked for us and giving you advice. This modification was tested on three different Core i7 5960X CPUs and different mainboards. Nothing died even after applying some ridiculous voltages. However, I can’t guarantee nothing will go wrong. In addition I have no idea how this could affect the lifespan of your chip. In other words: All modification on your own risk!

I tested this modification on the normal X99-SOC Force (without OC-Socket) and on the LN2 version with OC-Socket. It works on both boards without burning anything. However I can’t guarantee that it will work on all boards from other vendors. It would be up to you guys to test and approve this. I’m pretty confident that it will work though.

So in order to achive higher uncore clocks we have to modify some of the CPU voltages. This means we have to mod the CPU. Yes – talking about modding a USD $1,000 processor. There are two ways how to do this. The first way is the “lazy solution” and depending on your chip and board you should be able to run 4000-4200 MHz with this mod. For everything above you have to step up to solution two.

Basic explanation

I was trying to find the difference between the OC-Socket and the normal LGA2011 socket. So I just took the X99-SOC Force (no OC-Socket) and the X99-SOC Force LN2 (with OC-Socket) and measured the differences between the pins. After that I soldered thin wires to the empty pins of the CPU and measured the voltages while it was running. I came across two additional voltages which are not supplied on the normal socket, but are present on the OC-Socket. However the CPU internally supplies itself with different voltages there.

The key is to get both of these to the same level and increase if you need even higher clocks. Since I have no pin-out of the OC-Socket or pin-in of the CPU itself I will name this “uncore supply voltage”.

  • Pin 1 (uncore supply voltage 1): 1,075 Volt on stock
  • Pin 2 (uncore supply voltage 2): 1,350 Volt on stock

The 4G-Lazy-Mod

A lot of boards out there seem to have a wall at around 3600 MHz to 3700 MHz. To bypass this wall we have to get the both supply voltages to the same level. So just connect both pins on the CPU which will result in a voltage of about 1,260 Volt. This should be fine for 4000 to 4100 MHz according to my testing.

The connected pins will be above this little area on the normal socket. Make sure you keep the mod as small and thin as possible. The CPU directly fits on the piece of plastic once you push it down by the mounting mechanism. If it’s too high it could be that not all pins touch the CPU anymore.

I soldered directly on the CPU. Please only do this if you are already experienced in soldering. Otherwise it could happen that you connect more pins and kill your chip.
I suggest that you cover the rest of the pins while soldering. Here at the GIGABYTE OC Lab we had some special soldering tape that is temperature resistant and doesn’t melt. No clue how this is called exactly or where you can find it but this makes the mod very easy to apply.

Another solution would be to use some kind of silver conductive paint but I didn’t test this myself.

The 4G+ Mod

The things you need:

  • Soldering iron
  • Soldering tape
  • Small wire
  • External power device such as GIGABYTE G-Power
  • Multimeter
  • Soldering experience

4 GHz might be cool on the uncore but I think we all are aiming for 4500-5000 MHz on LN2, so for this we need to raise the uncore supply voltage. It’s not that easy to just apply a voltage to a CPU with no pin available at this position in the socket. So I grabbed one of my favorite external power devices (GIGABYTE G-Power-Board!) and connected it to the pins.

To get the mod working you have to connect both pins like in the lazy version and add a wire at the same time. Take a very thin wire and solder it to the pins. Also here it helps a lot if you have this special soldering tape to cover the rest of the CPU. I measured the current flow in circuit of this mod and it’s usually between 25 mA and 80 mA so a thin wire is no problem at all.

Now carefully place the CPU in the socket and close it. Take a measurement device and check the resistance from the wire to GROUND (anywhere on the board). On all CPUs I tested I had a resistance of 15,4 Ohm to ground. Of course this might vary depending on your multimeter but the value should be around this. If it’s far off like 2 Ohm or even 1 kOhm take the CPU out of the socket and check the mod if you connected a third pin or the wrong pins.

If the resistance is fine connect this wire to the V1 area of the G-Power-Board. Connect the ground area to any ground of your mainboard. I suggest to use a ground close to the CPU and not e.g. a 4-Pin molex of your PSU. An easy way is to use the voltage measurement area of the mainboard. I used one of the measuring cables and connected the ground there. It’s handy because you can just plug it in and out which disables/enables the mod (keep in mind that the two bridged pins are still fine to go to 4000 MHz even if the 4G+ mod is disabled!).

If you have a different external power module it’s fine as well. Just make sure the stock voltage is around 1,20 Volt and you can go up to 1,70 Volt in small steps. Since we are talking about a load of not even 0,1 Watt you don’t need a strong power device.

If you turn on your system make sure the voltage of your G-Power is at about 1,2 – 1,25 Volt. This will be fine to do any kind of tuning in the BIOS and usually around 4000 MHz uncore frequency.

To get higher clocks you have to test a bit and find the right voltages to boot and run for your CPU. Also not sure how it will be on other boards than GIGABYTE but should be similar.

Since all chips differ a little you might need to find the right voltages. This is a workaround which worked for Sofos and me. You can use this as a guide at the beginning. Once you find the right voltages you can usually skip the steps 2-5. We managed to boot directly to windows with 4125 uncore. We always used the 125 BCLK strap.

  • 1. Set a low uncore like 3000 MHz and apply all other settings you need such as voltages, features and memory.
  • 2. Apply and go back to bios.
  • 3. Raise the uncore to a higher level which you know was stable without the mod (we always used 3500 MHz) and apply. Check that the system does not power off after you changed the uncore. Otherwise it will be much more difficult to do this.
  • 4. Apply and go to bios
  • 5. Raise the voltage while you are in bios to about 1,40 and apply the voltage
  • 6. Change the uncore multi to the level where you experienced the wall before applying the mod. We set to 3750 MHz uncore
  • 7. Apply. It should now reboot without shutting down.
  • 8. Boot into windows with 3750 MHz
  • 9. Apply 32x uncore (4000 MHz)
  • 10. If you want to go higher just raise the uncore support voltage and keep testing what works for your chip.

We could do 4500 MHz uncore at about 1,55 Volt on air. 1,70 volt was fine for about 4700 MHz uncore on LN2. Don’t forget to change the normal uncore voltage in your bios though. It’s a completely different voltage and not related to the uncore supply voltage we are talking about in this guide! You still have to increase the normal uncore voltage in order to reach high uncore clocks.

Tested and confirmed with 3 different 5960X CPUs. I’m not sure how/if it works on the 6-Core Haswell-E and other motherbords but I think it should be the same. However I suggest to not apply this mod on CPUs if you use them on boards with OC-Socket such as ASUS R5E.

Confirmed Mods

  • 5960X – 4500 MHz 1,525 Volt (4G+ Mod)
  • 5960X – 4500 MHz 1,57 Volt (4G+ Mod)
  • 5960X – 4125 MHz 1,26 Volt (4G-Lazy Mod)

Confirmed Motherboards

  • GIGABYTE X99-SOC Force rev 0.2 (4G+ Mod)
  • GIGABYTE X99-SOC Force rev 1.0 (4G+ Mod)
  • GIGABYTE X99-SOC Force rev 0.2 (4G-Lazy Mod)
  • GIGABYTE X99-SOC Force rev 1.0 (4G-Lazy Mod)
  • GIGABYTE X99-SOC Force LN2 rev 1.0 (4G-Lazy Mod)

57

Belgium Massman says:

Alrighty, we're back at soldering on the CPU :-)

TaPaKaH says:

No big deal, it's only $1k to lose :)

On a more serious note, would it be possible to produce some adapters that you put on the CPU and adjust this voltage? Kind of like 771-to-775 adapters.

Australia TeamAU says:

I like you and all Roman, but that is some madness right there

Sam test is and report back

Poland Xtreme Addict says:

Thx for sharing :)

South Africa Vivi says:

wow!!!

Germany der8auer says:

Sam OCX said: No big deal, it's only $1k to lose :)

On a more serious note, would it be possible to produce some adapters that you put on the CPU and adjust this voltage? Kind of like 771-to-775 adapters.


Yes I'm already working on that :D

Poland ludek says:

Nice, I love reverse engineering :)

France marmott says:

Thank you Roman. Time to buy some conductive ink, at least you can remove it compare to straight soldering. It's a patch but I don't think it's the whole solution as 4.7G uncore is benchable almost stock voltage if you processor is cold. But it's great to have a fix :)

France kimir says:

Nice guide!
Oh, the soldering tape name you are looking for in kapton. ;)

United Kingdom 8 Pack says:

Great guide mate. Awesome work.

Greece mortisboy says:

wow...Roman you went too far man :D
for sure i will try it when my cpu comes!

United States Redmax says:

Reminds me of the wire mod to unlock multipliers on the old AXP, Only difference? this is considerably more complex, it is for voltage and you have to solder. Wait, hold that thought I need to get my iPhone 6 out of the microwave.

CL3P20 says:

nice work!

United States sin0822 says:

nice job! Excellent guide!

Norway Nassuz says:

Thats some awesome findings and testing guys...

Greece FireKillerGR says:

I love the vrm board on cpu thing; next lvl of hw mods incoming :D

Czech Republic buildzoid says:

The article isn't showing up for me. D:

Hong Kong Chi-Kui Lam says:

Yesterday , I did a test by conduction pen method , I can do 5.95GHz CPU 3.8GHz Cache very easy on Pi 32M !! before the mod I can't do 3.8GHz Cache and High CPU Clock the same time !!

This Mod helps for the Cache much stable and possible to finished 5m18s Pi 32M , This benchmark is extreme cache relative.

This is CherV™ Pi 32M Plain® Run Reault:
http://hwbot.org/submission/2637384_

Germany der8auer says:

Awesome so it's confirmed for ASRock X99 OC Formula aswell. Thanks for testing!

Belgium Massman says:

Thanks for testing, John! (Yes, the article is back up)

Germany Bullshooter says:

Good work Roman and thanks for sharing.

United States steponz says:

Good stuff

Poland G.Foyle says:

Is there any reason a simple linear regulator with adjustable output would not work for providing this additional voltage? G-powerboard seems like overkill for providing a few tens milliamps.

Germany der8auer says:

No like I said in the guide you can use any kind of power source. The load is just about 0,1 W so you can basically use everything.

United States Max/OCer says:

Tried it on MSI, hitting 5.5Ghz cache thanks der8auer!

Belgium leeghoofd says:

Darn Max, do you give also special tutoring lessons to the elderly ?

Netherlands nedernakker says:

5.5 GHz Max? awesome... How did you tune the voltage transponder variable?
Did you use a positive offset voltage or something else?

United States Max/OCer says:

Connected the other 2 sets of pad locations plus this one to on board POS cap
Still waiting to hear back from HQ if we can release the full mod

Germany der8auer says:


United States sin0822 says:

xoqolatl said: Is there any reason a simple linear regulator with adjustable output would not work for providing this additional voltage? G-powerboard seems like overkill for providing a few tens milliamps.


U know I was looking into this, if you have a dead mobo around they have tons of linear regulators on them, usually there is one powering the CPU PWM and its easy to extract since there aren't many components around it usually and some datasheets have typical circuits you can build with equations for controlling the output. I also have a circuit development device that has multiple low voltage adjustable dc power supplies on it, however the current is too low, on those you could use an amplifier and boost the current output. My only concern is how dirty the power could be going in and how much it matters in this case.

this is one linear regulator i was looking into:
http://www.xdevs.com/pdf/DCDC/uP7704.pdf

Australia Dinos22 says:

haha Max is legit man, legit

United Kingdom Zeed says:

DER8AUER any update about adapter ??

Germany der8auer says:

Still waiting for a prototype. Seems to take a bit :D

United Kingdom Zeed says:

Longer than i would expect hehe :) First time since duron 700 or so i went with different MB than Asus and well should have went Asus :P btw. Shame i never bothered to make proper profile on HWbot since overclocking since 286sx times.

United States Schmuckley says:

I see what you did there :D

United States sin0822 says:

MaxOCer said: Connected the other 2 sets of pad locations plus this one to on board POS cap





Still waiting to hear back from HQ if we can release the full mod


any updates?

Belgium Massman says:

Zeed said: Longer than i would expect hehe :) First time since duron 700 or so i went with different MB than Asus and well should have went Asus :P
btw. Shame i never bothered to make proper profile on HWbot since overclocking since 286sx times.


It's never too late http://hwbot.org/benchmark/superpi_-_1m/rankings?hardwareTypeId=processor_2082&cores=1#start=0#interval=20#familyId=232

:D

Germany der8auer says:

BTW if you guys don't want to use epower you can always just hook the mod up to a different voltage. VDIMM is usually pretty good because you can use ~1,25 Volt to boot but raise up to 1,7 Volt which is exactly what you need.

Germany der8auer says:

So the lazy mod helped vivi to even go to 4500 MHz on cache. Using MSI X99S MPOWER. Good work man! http://hwbot.org/submission/2657726_vivi_cinebench_r15_core_i7_5960x_2180_cb

Doc.Brown says:

Tested lazy mod three times with different size of solder and it never works on my 5820K ES with SOC Force Rev1.0,first boot after soldering always failed(don't remenber the post code) but second/next boots were goods and when I unmount CPU the solder seems to had melt again ;)

United States Splave says:

can we get a better picture of the advanced mod? Is it the lazy mod then add a wire to both pads?

United States horgantm says:

so all that is required is to have those 2 pins on the cpu bridged, dont need to mod mobo right? So just bridge em and stick it back in and hope for the best? glad I got a ESD safe soldering gun, I have done a lot of soldering on small soundboards so this should be do able. Are there adapters planned so no soldering is required? thanks

Germany der8auer says:

Yea just bridge. Nothing else is needed. No mods on the mainboard. The first adapter I tried had a bad connection and the system froze randomly. Still trying to get a proper solution.

United Kingdom Zeed says:

Thanks for update. So its going somewhere :)

United States sin0822 says:

crico said: Tested lazy mod three times with different size of solder and it never works on my 5820K ES with SOC Force Rev1.0,first boot after soldering always failed(don't remenber the post code) but second/next boots were goods and when I unmount CPU the solder seems to had melt again ;)


interesting maybe its different for the 6-core CPUs.

United States Splave says:

works on the ASRock x99 OCF x41 with EZ mod x46 with Hard mod 1.60v Epower


Thanks for sharing the mod!

United States horgantm says:

if I connect the 2 pins with 30awg wire, or event a 5mm accent leg (the little sticks that poke out) like this,
would that be too thick that it would not allow the cpu to sit correctly? Is it best just to connect the 2 pins with solder itself, and bridge the pads that way?

BTW anyone make a converter so us poor souls without OC socket dont have to do this? :)

Germany Eddy2317 says:

sin0822 said: interesting maybe its different for the 6-core CPUs.


i would not assume that, because of the asus oc socket, but i might be wrong

my i7 5930k is on its way, but i wont try...overclocking noob

Italy giorgioprimo says:





did the lazy mod .
mobo asrock x99 formula
cpu RETAIL

Didn't get any improvement on air.
SAme wall as before........

Anybody can confirm that used the mod on retail cpu and get improvement on air ?

United Kingdom Zeed says:

der8auer any news on cpu pad ??

United Kingdom Zeed says:

I guess the idea died :(

Slovenia tiborrr says:

It works on retail 5820K, tried both mods. For 2nd mod I did it without external power device. Just connect it to VDDR MOSFET or coil and your VDDR = you "uncore signal voltage".

MSI X99S XPOWER AC
Before mod: 3700MHz
After Easy 4G mod: 4100MHz
After 4G+ mod: 4500MHz (1.6Vddr = 1.6V "uncore signal voltage")

This CPU is capped at 4500, test on X99-DELUXE, will have to try with my 5960X.

Slovenia tiborrr says:

I have used the wire from the 80-pin IDE cable (ATA66+), don't know what AWG gauge is that but it seems to be working without a hitch.

Here you can see it connected to Vddr inductor:



Thanks Roman for the mod! :banana:

Germany der8auer says:

Nice solution with the VDDR! :) Glad it worked for you.

Slovenia tiborrr says:

Hope this helps everybody for the upcoming MOA competition :)

Germany oldirdey says:

Great Mod! Don´t know if anyone told you; the special heat resistant Tape you used for covering the pins is called "Kapton Tape or here in germany Kaptonband" Easy to get!

Canada nexxusty says:

I cannot see this not working for a 5930k.

Can ANYBODY verify? I have a window fogger repair kit I used for 775 BSEL mods. I'm sure it will work just fine for the lazy mod. Looking for 4ghz+, at 3.6ghz right now and it's just not enough.

;)

EVGA Motherboard.... never again. Solid (very solid), but lacking in options.

Please log in or register to comment.

Leave a Reply: (BBCODE allowed: [B], [QUOTE], [I], [URL], [IMG],...)